How To Pick A Dog Training Class

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How To Pick A Dog Training Class

Whether you are looking for a Puppy class, a Beginning, Intermediate, or Advanced Obedience class, or any class or workshop, you want to know the following things:
1. Is the owner of the company a dog trainer?
There are many reasons the owner of the company should be a dog trainer. Only a trainer really knows what is important for dogs. The top priority in a large company with chain stores is to make money. Training and the welfare of your dog are not a high priority for them. Many of the trainers in these large chain stores do not have the experience you need to teach you more than “sit”, “down”, and “stay”
2. Does the owner of the company live in the same state?
If the owner of the company lives out of state they are not involved in the dog to dog, day to day events that are happening in their classes. Training is not their priority, and they are not able to either teach classes themselves, or be able to…

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Foods That Are Hazardous to Dogs

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Foods That Are Hazardous to Dogs

Most dogs love food, and they’re especially attracted to what they see us eating. While sharing the occasional tidbit with your dog is fine, it’s important to be aware that some foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Take caution to make sure your dog never gets access to the foods below. Even if you don’t give him table scraps, your dog might eat something that’s hazardous to his health if he raids kitchen counters, cupboards and trash cans. For advice on teaching your dog not to steal food, please see our article, Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding. Avocado Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark may contain a toxic principle known as persin. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other varieties of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential. Birds, rabbits, and some large animals, including horses, are especially sensitive to avocados, as they can have respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart, and even death from consuming avocado. While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care. Avocado is sometimes included in pet foods for nutritional benefit. We would generally not expect avocado meal or oil present in commercial pet foods to…

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Foods That Are Hazardous to Cats

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Foods That Are Hazardous to Cats

Many cats are picky eaters, so they’re less likely than dogs to be attracted to certain human foods. Nevertheless, it’s important to be aware that some foods can be dangerous to cats. Bread Dough Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous to cats. When a cat swallows raw dough, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach can be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall and affect breathing. Also, as the yeast metabolizes the sugar in the dough, alcohol is produced. The alcohol can be absorbed, resulting in alcohol intoxication. Affected cats can have distended abdomens and show signs such as drunkenness, disorientation and vomiting (or attempts to vomit). In extreme cases, coma, seizures or even death from alcohol intoxication might occur. Cats who have abdominal distention or seem drunk should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover. All rising yeast dough should be kept out of reach of cats. Chocolate Most cats don’t have a sweet tooth. However, some will eat foods containing chocolate, such as chocolate candy, cookies, brownies and chocolate baked goods. These and other chocolate-flavored treats can cause chocolate intoxication in cats. The compounds in chocolate that are toxic are caffeine and theobromine, which belong to a group of chemicals called methylxanthines. These compounds cause stimulation of the heart and nervous system. The rule of thumb with chocolate is “the darker it is, the more dangerous it is.” White chocolate has very few methylxanthines and is of low toxicity. Dark baker’s chocolate, on the other hand, has high levels of methylxanthines. Plain, dry unsweetened cocoa powder contains the most concentrated levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate a cat eats, the signs can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and even death. Cats showing more than mild restlessness should be seen by a veterinarian immediately. Ethanol Ethanol, also known as ethyl alcohol, grain alcohol and drinking alcohol, can be very dangerous for cats. Due to their small size, cats are far more sensitive to ethanol than humans are. Even drinking a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant intoxication. Cats are often attracted to mixed drinks that contain milk, cream or ice cream (e.g., White Russians, alcoholic egg nog and Brandy Alexanders). Alcohol intoxication commonly causes vomiting, loss of coordination, disorientation and stupor. In severe cases, coma, seizures and death can occur. Cats who are intoxicated should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover. Moldy Foods A wide variety of molds grow on food. Some molds produce toxins called tremorgenic mycotoxins, which can cause serious or even life-threatening problems if eaten. Cats...

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Dangerous Household items

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Dangerous Household items

Household items that have the potential to cause serious illness, or even death Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (ibuprofen, aspirin, etc.) Acetaminophen Cold and flu medications Anti-depressants Vitamins Home insect products Rat and mouse bait Bleach Diet pills Disinfectants Fabric Softener Lead Lighter Fluid Mothballs Anti-cancer drugs Solvents (paint thinners, etc.) Flea and tick products Drain cleaners Liquid potpourri Slug and snail bait Oven cleaner sprays Lime/scale remover Fly bait Detergents Tobacco...

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Holiday Hazards

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Holiday Hazards

Thanksgiving Bones – Turkey, chicken and other small animal bones are very different from the large bones you find at the pet store. These small bones splinter easily and can cause serious internal damage if swallowed, so NEVER give them to your pet. Hot containers – Your dog or cat will most likely become curious when they smell something cooking. Keep an eye on hot containers so that your pet does not tip them over, causing severe burns. Christmas Holiday plants – The following holiday plants are toxic to cats and dogs: Christmas rose, Holly, Poinsettias, Lilies and Mistletoe. Ribbons – Sure it may look adorable, but placing a ribbon around your pet’s neck may cause them to choke. Bubbling lights – Older forms of this attractive decoration may contain methylene chloride, which is a highly toxic chemical. Fire salts – Contain chemicals that could be harmful to pets. Angel Hair (spun glass) – Can be irritating to eyes and skin, and could cause intestinal obstruction if eaten in large amounts. Christmas tree water – Stagnant tree water or water containing preservatives could result in stomach upset if ingested. Decoration hooks – Can cause blockage and/or trauma to gastrointestinal tract if swallowed. Styrofoam – Can cause your dog or cat to choke if swallowed. Ornaments – These can look like toys to your cat or dog, so keep them out of your pet’s reach so they don’t pose a risk of injury. Tinsel – Can cause choking or internal trauma if swallowed. New Year’s Balloons and Confetti – These are among the common items used to decorate a New Year’s party venue, but can pose an obstruction or choking hazard to your pet if ingested. Be sure to keep an eye on them when they around these items or place them in an area that does not have decorations. Loud noises – New Year’s is typically a noisy holiday. Unfortunately, loud noises frighten pets and can cause them to run off. Keep your pet in a separate room, away from noisemakers, music and other loud sounds that may startle them. Alcohol – Alcoholic beverages are toxic to pets and should never be given to your dog or cat. Halloween Happy Halloween Everyone! Halloween for your pets is different than for us. Please be aware that treats/candy that would normally be out of reach may be accessible to your pets during this time. Along with the dangers of some of these treats, your dog or cat may ingest the wrapper that they came in. Unfortunately people leave candy wrappers on the ground in the park, on your street, or anywhere. These wrappings can cause blockages and even death. Many candies and gums now use artificial sweeteners such as Xylitol which are toxic to your animals. Decorations are fun for us but may be scary for your pet (eating them is...

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Dangerous pet areas in your home

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Dangerous pet areas in your home

Indoors Balconies – Tall balconies without safety railings may lead to a dangerous fall. Bath tubs or sinks – When filled with water, a bath tub or a sink can cause a small pet to drown. Doors and windows – Open doors and windows commonly lead to dogs and cats running across busy roads. Electrical cords – Can cause electrocution if plugged into an outlet Fireplace – Flames can result in serious burns to your pet and ashes can cause illness if ingested. Toilets – Toilet water is not healthy for pets to drink; always remember to close the lid. Washer and dryer – Your dog or can can easily crawl into a washer or dryer without you knowing, so be sure to close the doors to these appliances when you are not using them. Outdoors Algae – Can be found in ponds or other bodies of water, certain forms can be toxic. Antifreeze/Coolant – Some types of antifreeze or coolant products contain ethylene glycol, which is highly toxic to dogs and cats, even in small amounts. Fire pit/Grill – Flames can result in serious burns and ashes can cause illness if ingested. Fences/Gates – Openings in damaged fences or gates can be used by your cat or dog to run away or could lead to strangulation if they become stuck. Deck lattice – Your dog or cat could become stuck in the openings under your deck and possibly strangle. De-icing Salts – Some formulations may contain chemicals that are hazardous to pets if ingested in large amounts. Look for “pet-friendly” de-icing salts. Compost (particularly if moldy) Gasoline Oil Pesticides Cocoa bean shell mulch fertilizer Swimming pools and hot tubs – Never leave your pet unattended near uncovered pools, even if they can...

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